Tag Archives: claire north

Book Reviews: June 2020 Reads

This month, I’d picked up two novellas by my favourite writers with high hopes. But the book I enjoyed reading the most turned out to be the work of an author completely new to me. So here’s to exploring more diverse voices this month. Thanks for reading, as always. x

The Serpent (by Claire North, 2015)
3/5

All things are chance. Nature is chance. Life is chance. It is a human madness to cry and find rules where there are none, to invent constraints where none exist. The only thing that matters is the choice. So choose.

Every political strife is in sum, a game. The Serpent takes that statement rather literally, turning the city into a chessboard and its people, pieces. The mystery is as fascinating as it sounds, and the first chapter of the trilogy unfolds in satisfying terms.

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Book Reviews: April 2020 Reads

We are 30-odd days into the lockdown, and I am not complaining about the extra time to read. Here are the books of the month.

A Lush and Seething Hell: Two Tales of Cosmic Horror (by John Hornor Jacobs, 2019)
4/5

Pleasure makes us numb, stupid, inert. Pain sparks our wicks. The light and scent of pain—the greater the better—draws the attention of the mighty. The prodigious. The vast and numberless.

The first of the two cosmic tales, The Sea Dreams It Is the Sky, is as gorgeously written as it sounds. The prose captivates right from the start with the charismatic poet Rafael Avendano, whom Isabel comes to fall in love with in spite of, or perhaps because of the danger in his reputation.

Caught in something less of a romance than a strange enchantment, she gradually learns of how he lost his eye and his life to the fascist regime. His story unfolds before her with as much grace and terror, gripping in every word.

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